Saturday, September 27, 2008


Remember always that you are just a visitor here, a traveller passing through. Your stay here is but short and the moment of your departure unknown. None can live without toil and a craft that provides your needs is a blessing indeed. But if you toil without rest, fatigue and weariness will overtake you and you will be denied the joy that comes from labour’s end. Speak quietly and kindly and be not forward with either opinions or advice. If you talk much this will make you deaf to what others say, and you should know that there are few so wise that they cannot learn from others. Be near when help is needed but far when praise and thanks are being offered. Take small account of might, wealth and fame for they soon pass and are forgotten. Instead, nurture love within you and strive to be a friend to all. Truly, compassion is a balm for many wounds. Treasure silence when you find it and while being mindful of your duties set time aside to be alone with yourself. Cast off pretence and self-deception and see yourself as you really are. Despite all appearances, no one is really evil. They are led astray by ignorance. If you ponder this truth often you will offer more light rather that blame and condemnation. You, no less all beings, have Buddha Nature within. Your essential mind is pure. Therefore, when defilements cause you to stumble and fall, let not remorse nor dark foreboding cast you down. Be of good cheer and with this understanding summons strength and walk on. Faith is like a lamp and wisdom it is that makes the light burn bright. Carry this light always and in good time the darkness will yield and you will abide in the light.


Wilfried said...

Banthe, thank you so much for this blog that gives me advise what to do during my busy live (especially at work) and how to thinking about things which bother me some times. It's not easy to stay calm in this work life with all this trouble and business. I will remember and read again and again. It will help I believe.
With metta, Wilfried

Paulo said...

Thank you, banthe.

Can I ask you to write a little bit more on 'Buddha Nature'?



boyadine said...

Dear Bhante, go on admit it, you wrote this didn't you? - to rival the desiderata, if not then what is it's origin? : ) Jake

Shravasti Dhammika said...

Dear Palo,
I will try to write something about Buddha Nature soon. And yes Jake, I did write the Dhammavadaka, although not really as an alternitave to the Desiderata, in 1985. Good guess!

boyadine said...

it's a great piece, during a retreat someone from singapore had placed a few copies of the dhammavadaka, nicely printed with a picture of sunlight filtering through a majestic forest tree, and i had framed it and placed it in my place of work for the past five years, it's very well written.. : )

dewi kayangan said...

Dear Rev. Dhammika,

I've a friend (a Christian) who has lost her hearing and is going blind. Her health is deteriorating and death could be nearer than anyone expectation.

She's living in fear each day.

I really hope you'll write on Death and Rebirth, for my own wisdom and insight are limited.

Grace Chan

Vasile Andreica said...

Quite a gem, Bhante. I translated it in Romanian on my blog, after adding yours in the blogroll. May wisdom be found right by all its lovers :)

Carolyn Amey-Timm said...

I would like to read this at a service but am unsure of the pronunciation of your name. Do I have your support? Please tell me how to say "Dhammavadaka"
is it like Dhamma vod a ka?
It would be an honor to share your wisdom and want to make sure I give you credit and pronounce things properly.

Thank you.

Taoist_Hawk said...

I like this quote..can you tell me where the source is? it part of the Pali Canon?

Michael Claffy said...

he Dhammavadaka is a poem composed by the Australian monk Bhante Dhammika in 1986.